Vaccine against fatal salmonella moves closer

A vaccine against a fatal strain of salmonella could be developed thanks to research led by Dr Calman MacLennan from the University of Birmingham.

His research team has discovered a protective salmonella-specific antibody that develops in African children that may help them to fight nontyphoidal salmonella, which can kill up to a quarter of infants under two-years-old in parts of the developing world.

Dr Calman MacLennan, who carried out the work while working for the Universities of Liverpool and Malawi, hopes the study will help to develop a vaccine or a treatment for the disease.

 For more details see the University of Birmingham.  

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Health science centres announced for region

The creation of three academic health science centres (AHSC) in the West Midlands has been announced by West Midlands minister Liam Byrne, MP, during a visit to The University of Warwick’s Medical School.

The AHSC at Warwick will be the first in the Midlands and will bring together all the NHS trusts across Coventry and Warwickshire to draw on the university’s world-leading research expertise in systems biology, engineering and medicine.

Another two AHSCs are planned in the region.

For more details see The University of Warwick.  

First mini medical school launched

Ever wanted to understand more about the human body and the latest treatments for illnesses without the need to spend five years at med school?

Birmingham University has come up with a solution with the first mini-medical school to be run in the UK.

A series of two-hour sessions over the 10-week course will tackle some of the major topics in medicine in a fun and accessible way, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, psychiatric disorders and communication between doctors and patients.

For more information see Birmingham University

Society-wide action needed over obesity

A group of experts tackling obesity have called for more widespread action across society to tackle a growing crisis.

The group of experts from Birmingham University have called for more to be done in areas like transport policy, town planning, education and access to sport to encourage a healthier lifestyles.

The group is focusing on developing research that looks to tackle obesity across our entire lifespan.

For more see Birmingham University.

Midlands winner of science medal

Aston University’s Professor Yvonne Perrie has been announced as the 2007 winner of the prestigious British Pharmaceutical Conference science medal, primarily for her work in improving the delivery of drugs using minute particles called liposomes.

The science medal is awarded annually to a scientist working in a pharmaceutical or related discipline who has produced work of outstanding promise and has demonstrated a proven track record of independent research.

Her research has been applied to improve the potency of drugs while reducing their side-effects and in particular to enhancing the effect of vaccines to protect against a range of infectious diseases.

For more details see Aston University

Research tries to ace tennis elbow

A three-year project to find an effective treatment for tennis elbow is set to start at Keele University.

The study will test the effectiveness of a form of electrical nerve stimulation treatment.

For more details see Keele University.

Car and health magazines launched by students

Magazines on car and health news have been launched by students at Coventry University.

Automotive, a 32-page magazine, is the work of five students studying for an MA in automotive journalism and Global Eye has been produced by MA students on the global and health journalism course.

All six of last year’s automotive journalism graduates are now working full-time for motoring magazines and websites, or in the motor industry itself.

For more details see Coventry University.